KEY POINTS

Coresight Research recently cohosted a Wellness Series podcast titled, “All Possibilities Live—Body Belief with Aimee Raupp,” with Mouthmedia Network, a premiere podcast network focused on the business of various lifestyle industries. The All Possibilities podcast was created and hosted by Julie Chan to explore the intersection of spirituality, business and science. This event focused on spiritual and unconventional approaches to pregnancy and health. 

Here, we share our top takeaways from the event:

  • Western medicine treats the branches of disease, while Chinese medicine is about treating the root.
  • Human thoughts can dictate human behaviors, and behaviors could eventually dictate lives.
  • Changing our beliefs about negative things could heal the body and have a positive impact on our lives. 

Coresight Research recently cohosted a Wellness Series podcast titled, “All Possibilities Live—Body Belief with Aimee Raupp,” with Mouthmedia Network, a premiere podcast network that focuses on the business of various lifestyle industries. The All Possibilitiespodcast was created and hosted by Julie Chan to explore the intersection of spirituality, business and science. This event focused on spiritual and unconventional approaches to pregnancy and health.

Rob Sanchez, CEO at Mouthmedia Network kicked off the event, introducing his company and the All Possibilitiespodcast. The event was then followed by a meditation practice led by Niki Manavi, the creator of Higher-Self Development protocol. Julie Chan, as the event host, interviewed the featured guest Aimee Raupp, who is an acupuncturist, herbalist and women’s health and fertility expert.

Below, are our top takeaways from the event:

Western Medicine Treats the Branches of Disease, While Chinese Medicine Is about Treating the Root

Missing out on the chance to become a medical doctor after graduating with a degree in Biology, guest speaker Aimee Raupp decided to apply to the University of California, San Diego to do research. It was there where—through her mentor at UCSD medical school and a Chinese herbalist—that she encountered Chinese medicine. Raupp shared a story of how Chinese medicine and acupuncture were able to cure diabetes; the story illuminated a brand-new approach of medicine to her and ignited her passion to study Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), a practice which has evolved over thousands of years in China, the practitioners of which use herbal medicines and mind and body practices such as acupuncture and tai chi to treat health problems. Raupp believes that the two practices of Chinese and Western medicine are “wonderfully complementary.” She shared her personal experience of how Chinese medicine helped her recover from her C-section and eased her father’s experience with cancer. 

The podcast host Julie Chan also shared her unique perspective of Chinese medicine growing up in a Chinese family in the US. Chan said she felt culturally conflicted: often feeling confused to have Chinese medicine from family while being raised in New York City. It took her a long time to see the merits of Chinese medicine and to trust that what her mother did was not crazy at all. She talked about her “sick period” after giving birth, and how Chinese medicine helped her recovery.

Human Thoughts Can Dictate Human Behaviors and Behaviors Could Eventually Dictate Lives

According to Raupp, “what we think has been scientifically shown to impact our physiology and neural chemistry.” Humans’ number one limiting thought is “I am my own nest.” We should not let our disease diagnoses define who we are, instead, Raupp believe we should learn to shift our thoughts—from “I have x” to “I am 100% healed.” She described how during her teenage self she had inflexible thoughts. When she failed her MCAT test after college, she thought her life was over. However, looking back now, she says “self-love is a cliché, but we all deserve it.” 

Raupp believes that when people walk into a tough environment, they need to list five things they like about the person, job or life and focus on those. This will then change the responses and eventually the relationship to the person, job or life. She called this “the energy shift,” which is also the shift of interactions with the world. Raupp suggested we need to give up such thoughts as “I have tried everything, but nothing has worked.”

Changing Our Beliefs about Negative Things Could Heal the Body and Have a Positive Impact on Our Lives 

Raupp introduced the concept of how someone decides to support and nourish their body, and it impacts the body’s cellular renewal. She said, “you have the power to choose the food you eat, the people you stand with and your thoughts.” Although some diseases cannot be cured, Raupp says they can be healed—become symptom-free. When asked, she shared a story about how she treated a client dealing with infertility. She was able to heal the client, following a miscarriage, by changing her thoughts and helping the client love her body again.  She also said, “you should start to listen to the cues from your body,” which could change your thoughts and eventually heal your body.

Chan recalled her experience with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), a disorder that can lead to easy or excessive bruising and bleeding, how her vision deteriorated during her high school years. She wanted to believe that her vision would get better, even though the damage to her retina was permanent. 

Raupp shared her secret for being able to ground herself—eating good quality food, meditating every day, listening to Abraham-Hicks (audio recordings by motivational speaker and author Esther Hicks) and heavy breathing.


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